As Leonard said (sort of), The crack can help you see the light…

You can learn a lot about wisdom from underwear and butt cracks. Stay with me now. When we were young and unaware of social conventions, we pulled our underwear out of our butt crack without a second thought. It was uncomfortable, so we did something about it. One day someone, often a parent or other relative, no longer thought this behavior was cute and told us to stop. We did, or at least we tried to remember not to do it, because we knew that Mommy or someone else we loved, or who was in charge, didn’t like it when we did that. Eventually we were told that adjusting our underwear was rude, or they called it a dirty habit. During our adolescent years most of us cringed away from touching ourselves anywhere in public — the weight of peer judgment turned our waking lives into some sort of horrible nightmare dance of freeze tag. Or, perhaps, we chose to rebel against expectations and do all the public touching we could just to prove that we had the right to do whatever the F we wanted. Even when we became full-fledged adults we would still rather suffer a raging rash than have anyone see us adjusting our underwear. How did we let ourselves get to the place where intimate chafing is preferable to being judged for saving our own asses? Our younger self understood what needed to be done. We didn’t ask for permission because who asks if it’s okay to take their fingers out of a fire? The message we were/are given is clear: it’s better to harm ourselves than to be seen as doing something (anything) that goes against a social code. (Enter things such as not telling other people that Mommy or Daddy hurts us or each other.) When we were young we did what we were told because we didn’t know any better. What about now? We don’t have to rebel against the code by exaggerating and calling attention to adjusting what needs to be adjusted, but seriously, why allow yourself to incur pain in intimate areas just so no one judges you as less than or low class or whatever? (Draw your own parallels here.) The message is clear: your comfort and wellbeing are trumped by the collective decisions of others. I do not buy into this. Maybe you shouldn’t either. After all, once they get a hold of your underwear, who knows what they’ll try to control.

Cinse, a former professor with a background in the psychology of human learning, writes nonstop, and is addicted to capturing the human experience in words.